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Biochemistry And Clotting

Biochemistry
Biochemistry values usually are to do with the fluid balance in your body and its ability to use electrolytes (substances that provide cells with energy) such as sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphate, magnesium and glucose.

Kidney function is also represented in this test. In advanced liver failure the kidney function can be badly affected. Urea is the end product of protein usage by the body. Creatinine is the end product of metabolism in the body. Both of these values will rise with worsening kidney function.

Clotting
As the liver is involved in clotting, it is standard procedure to have clotting studies done when any ‘invasive’ procedure is planned such as biopsy, surgical procedures and operations. A clotting profile is made to assess your risk of bleeding. If your risk for bleeding is very high, your procedure/surgery may be postponed until a later date.

Values and substances involved in clotting include:

Prothrombin time (PT): This test measures the time taken for a clot to form in a blood sample. This is compared against values in healthy people and is an important value for indicating the clotting ability of your blood, as influenced by the presence or lack of vitamin K. The prothrombin time will take longer as a result of deficiencies in vitamin K.

INR (international normalised ratio): As the chemicals used to perform the PT test may vary between laboratories, the INR is a calculation the doctors use to allow for any changes when results from different laboratories are compared. This is an important consideration when you have been prescribed blood-thinning products such as warfarin.

APTR (activated partial thromboplastin time ratio): The APTR is the time taken for thromboplastin to convert into thrombin.

Fibrinogen: This is another substance in the blood that helps clotting by producing fibrin strands. Platelets stick to the fibrin strands to form a plug that prevents bleeding. The presence of drugs and poisons in your body can also alter the clotting pathway (normal course of coagulation) of the liver. This may the case if you are receiving medications such as aspirin, clopidogrel or warfarin.

The presence of drugs and poisons in your body can also alter the clotting pathway (normal course of coagulation) of the liver. This may the case if you are receiving medications such as aspirin, clopidogrel or warfarin.